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Dealing With Facebook’s New Promotional Content Penalty

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Late last week Facebook announced a significant change to its news feed algorithm as it pertains to promoted posts.

Though the change – slated to go live in Jan 2015 – will hit retailers and/or eCommerce sites the hardest, there are some key ways you can deal with this penalty before it costs you a dime:[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

The Rule Of Quality Content Still Stands

Facebook is making this change to crack down on pages that go for the “hard sell” with a direct call to action (CTA) in a promoted post. We’ve known this for a while, including their move earlier this year to eliminate “like bait.” As of now, Facebook is just trying to make it harder to get away with bad content by penalizing marketers that try to compensate with promoted posts.

Chances are if you’re creative and make your content stand out with personality, value to the reader (outside the CTA), and that appeals to the way users naturally share and converse on Facebook you’ll be fine.  If you’re {achem} more laid back about your content and it sounds a little too much like a billboard or a banner ad, you’re going to find it much more expensive to get your content read[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

Avoid “Hard Sell” Keywords In Your Posts

For instance, if your post says “buy now,” “click here,” “enter our promotion,”  or similar CTAs, it will likely trigger the penalty. This includes promotions without a ton of context (i.e. sweepstakes vs. contests).

The good news is that this is not a deal-killer for promotions on Facebook.  You just have to think through how you make “the ask” for promotions and consider the venue.  It’s possible that Instagram, Tumblr or Twitter might make a better platform for a promotion depending on how explicit you need the CTA to be.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]

Make Ads Unique From Promoted Posts

This the easiest thing to avoid.  Facebook is now going to cross-reference your promoted posts and ads.  If the content overlaps, it will invoke the penalty and it will costs you more to reach the same amount of people.

My advice for this one is that if you have hard sells, use them in your ads.  Use your posts to tell a story, to highlight content, and/or highlight an issue.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width=”1/1″][vc_column_text]Again, this penalty only affects promoted posts starting in 2015.  It does not mean promoted posts are going away but you may see impact on your ultimate reach numbers and cost.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

AU Brands Held Liable For Facebook Comments, Will USA Follow Suit?

Startling news from down under for social media pros; brands will be held liable for fan comments posted to their Facebook walls.

The ruling, made by Australia’s Advertising Standards Bureau (ASB), stems from complaints made regarding posts to the Australian version of the Foster’s and Diageo Facebook pages.  Essentially, what this means is that, in Australia, user comments on managed profiles like Facebook walls will be held to the same standard as any other advertisement.

The ASB argues that this is an extension of rules currently in place and should not affect actively-managed pages.  However, it does pose a greater threat pages that either don’t have constant moderation or believe that user comments are an extension of free speech and should not be interfered with.

By in large, this should not affect US brands but it does pose an interesting question regarding the future of community management.  The FTC, the closest thing we have in the USA to the Australian ASB, has usually stayed out of social media management questions.  That have set standards for blogger-brand relationships in general but they defer to the specific terms of agreement for the sites like Facebook.

The question is can brands in the USA continue to treat users’ comments as an extension of free speech and should they do more to manage comments on their Facebook walls?

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