Meerkat: Worth The First-Mover Risk?

Why the new live-streaming app might just be worth the risk for brands.

One of the biggest gambles a digital media professional can make is recommending a new social media platform. If it goes right, the client wins accolades for being a first mover. If it goes wrong, you’re the geek that cried “wolf” and wasted a lot of time and money.

This week, #SXSW will be abuzz about a new platform called Meerkat. Simply put, it’s a live-streaming video app that has direct integration with to Twitter. Meerkat-ers can schedule streams in advance or do one on the fly. Twitter users see Meerkat streams right in their feed if they follow the user’s Twitter accounts. Watching videos is fun and users can even tweet in-app to comment on streams.

We’ve seen other apps like this, such as Qik that never really took off. However, I’m actually kind of bullish on Meerket and here’s why:

1. It’s easy to get your head around.

Unlike Snapchat – which I still can’t figure out – the premise of Meerkat is simple. It’s interface is understandable and it conforms to video viewing and commenting behavior that users have become used to thanks to with popular platforms like YouTube and Webex.

2. It takes advantage of pre-existing platforms. 

I can’t underscore the importance of Twitter in the Meerkat equation. Rather than asking you to sign up for a new platform, users log in with their Twitter name and password. This is critical because I believe that users are at or nearing a point of platform saturation. Allowing users to skip the account creation process is going to speed adoption in a big way.

3. It fulfills a business need.

Finally, Meerkat delivers on something I think that users can enjoy and that marketers could really use – the fusion of streaming video and chat. The potential for use across PR, event marketing, and even corporate communications is HUGE. Just think about live-streaming a press conference, a product reveal, or even a just an “ask me anything” session.

Though we’ll have to wait and see if Meerkat really debuts as big as I think it will, it made a big enough impression on me to start ideating on ways my clients can utilize the new platform. In the meantime, follow me at @jareddegnan for live streams.

What “Work Hard, Play Hard” Actually Means

Ever notice that companies love to talk about what kinds of perks they offer as a way of explaining their company culture?

For instance, they talk about “flex time” when they value loyalty and longevity.  When they value energy and hyperactive productivity, they talk about “cross-functional training.”  My favorite “perk pitch” though is when they say they “work hard, play hard!”

You hear this phrase a lot in the agency world.  Most people take this to mean that the culture is young, fun and driven. Companies talk about all the fun things they do like Thursday afternoon socials, wild and crazy holiday parties, and sometimes even cruises.

What it really means, though is that they company wants you to gloss over the time you spend in the office in preference for remembering the good times when they got you plastered.

In my experience, the companies that tout a “work hard, play hard” mentality use it to excuse a lack of attention and interest in the actual working environment.

Now, maybe this is something that other people knew, already. Perhaps its an accepted fact and people are perfectly fine excusing the 8 to 14 hours a day they spend in the office as long as they get to blow off that steam at the end of it.

To me though, this is a relatively new realization.  I say “relatively” because I stopped working at those kinds of companies when I stopped drinking. The least rewarding part of my job became the times I have to stand around during office parties watching other people make idiots out of themselves.

What I wanted in a work experience changed and I became a lot more cognizant of the time I spend in the office. To me, I want a company culture that works for a purpose and cultivates their employees talent with peer-to-peer development and a chance to explore your own career potential.

I’m not trying to disparage recreation with your co-workers. I’m really not.  I just find there’s something to this pattern I can’t ignore.

Photo Courtesy of Whatleydude

© 2015 – 2016 Degnan Media | All rights reserved.